Featured Image

AMT Tech Report: Issue #260

Generative design is for tools. A skills stimulus for industrial robotics. OpenAI is pro-regulation. Exoskeletons are actually happening. DOD and MOD all like the 3DP.
May 19, 2023

Slow is smooth, smooth is fast.

– Unknown


1. Generative Design Is for Tools 

Watch out, Knipex, because now they’re coming with pliers! The Alu-Zange is a robust and lightweight hand plier designed by Jakob Kukula, a former student at Bauhaus University, Weimar. It was designed using a generative algorithm known as SKO, or soft kill option, which uses algorithms to determine the least amount of material required to retain 100% product functionality. The hand plier has an ergonomic design that comes with a four-point linkage system that lets you grip objects easily. 

Read more here.


2. A Skills Stimulus for Industrial Robotics  

Alphabet's Intrinsic has announced their first product, Flowstate, an intuitive, web-based developer environment for building robotic applications from concept to deployment. Flowstate allows developers to get started without deep expertise, simulates and validates solutions without developers touching a single piece of hardware, and encodes domain knowledge in custom “skills” that can be used and reused. Applications are now being accepted for Flowstate’s first beta program, which begins in July 2023. 

Read more here.


3. OpenAI Is Pro-Regulation  

All right, I’m sure this triggered folks who sold subprime mortgages to people with bad credit and nothing down in a past life. It takes greed to know greed, and this looks like Sam Altman is trying to eliminate the competition before it’s born. Call me a lemming, but OpenAI does have the best AI platform currently available, and they didn’t rush it to market (unlike the competition). Because ethics. Listen, if I’m wrong and Skynet takes over, send me a check for $10,000 and write “I told you so” on the memo line. 

Read more here.


4. Exoskeletons Are Actually Happening! 

John Deere employees are now using Comau's MATE-XT exoskeletons to improve ergonomic risk, reduce muscle fatigue, and maintain balance while performing their jobs. The exoskeleton is EAWS-certified and helps workers sustain heavy packages with minimal effort. Comau also provided hands-on training for using the devices at John Deere’s parts distribution center in Campinas, Brazil, and conducted an electromyographic analysis to measure the ergonomic improvements and benefits of the exoskeleton. 

Read more here.


5. DOD and Now MOD All Like the 3DP  

SFM Technology, an aerospace and defense company, 3D printed a main rotor blade restraint cradle for the Royal Navy's AgustaWestland AW101 helicopter. They used the BigRep PRO 3D printer and Hi-Temp CF, a carbon fiber material with strong wear, tear, and pressure resistance. Tests revealed that 3D-printed parts performed better than the original, non-printed parts. Additive manufacturing is becoming more accepted in the aerospace and defense industry as it displays its speed and cost-effectiveness. 

Read more here.


To get the latest tech developments delivered directly to your inbox, subscribe to the weekly Tech Report here.

To access Tech Trends, log in to or register for an MTInsight account at https://www.mtinsight.org/ 

PicturePicture
Author
Stephen LaMarca
Technology Analyst
Recent technology News
AI and advanced sensors transform robotics, enabling direct force control with feedback. This article explores AI's role in integrated force control, predictive modeling, and their impact on robotic performance and end effectors across applications.
Back to the grind. Composites era. It's not just for children. Additive McDonald's. Computational gastronomy.
Robot developers are building upon the advanced technology already used in manufacturing today to design autonomous robot assistants that will one day help the elderly and people with physical limitations live more independently.
Flow-through suppressors. Chippity China. Training robots with AI. Industrial tech trends 2024: Hannover Messe. Robot roadmap recommendations.
Our shared history with robotics may hint at our continued future. Once thought of as products, and then perhaps free agents, and then even colleague cooperators, robots are becoming more integrated into our everyday lives.
Similar News
undefined
Technology
By Stephen LaMarca | Jul 19, 2024

Supply chain orchestration. Aussie brick-laying robot truck. Physical AI sensors. Royalberry PI. 3D printing with resin stinks.

7 min
undefined
Technology
By Nina Anderson | Jul 18, 2024

AI and advanced sensors transform robotics, enabling direct force control with feedback. This article explores AI's role in integrated force control, predictive modeling, and their impact on robotic performance and end effectors across applications.

5 min
undefined
Technology
By Bonnie Gurney | Feb 08, 2024

At IMTS 2024, discover unexpected solutions, including haptic feedback to improve remote robot operation and digital training, quality control software, additive manufacturing powders and gases, services to address labor issues via an app, and more.

5 min