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AMT Tech Trends: Deciphered Texts, Sold Out 3D Printers, and Generative AI

Episode 105: The Tech Frends kicks things off with a discussion on design for maintenance! Steve also announces that robot tooling is en route to the testbed cobot. Elissa shares how AI is used to decipher ancient texts. Benjamin closes with generative AI.
Oct 30, 2023

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Produced by Ramia Lloyd

Transcript:

Ramia Lloyd:

Welcome to the Tech Trends Podcast, where we discuss the latest manufacturing, technology, research, and news. Today's episode is sponsored by IMTS+, powered by AMT. I'm Ramia Lloyd, producer, and I'm here with-

Elissa Davis:

I'm Elissa Davis, the digital community specialist.

Stephen LaMarca:

Steven LaMarca, AMT's best technology analyst for eight years in a row now.

Benjamin Moses:

I'm Benjamin Moses, director of technology. I can't top that, Steve.

Ramia Lloyd:

Yeah, that was good intro.

Stephen LaMarca:

AMT's number one technology analyst for eight years straight.

Benjamin Moses:

You've got JD's Power Award for technology [inaudible 00:00:53].

Stephen LaMarca:

That's like my favorite JD Power Award, initial reliability. Everything's reliable when it's brand new.

Benjamin Moses:

That's a good segue because we got some beef with maintenance.

Stephen LaMarca:

Let's talk about maintenance, my favorite topic. What are we talking about?

Benjamin Moses:

[inaudible 00:01:07].

Stephen LaMarca:

Okay. So I recently did my brakes and I'm very excited about it and I can't stop talking about it, but I actually can't stop talking about it because some more LinkedIn posts have been circulating about metal additive, metal 3D printing, and of course, hot cars and the new hypercar company, which I don't think has delivered a single car yet, Czinger.

Founded by some rich dude with an actual talent for, an eye for quality manufacturing and advanced technologies has this amazing hypercar that I assume he was going to be making soon, but the entire subframes, the chassis, the suspension linkages is all made using generative AI and metal additive. So it's a lot of organic shapes, but one of the most drool worthy parts on this car is the metal 3D printed monoblock brake caliper that's integrated with the suspension knuckle.

Benjamin Moses:

I like the way those 3D printed calibers because a couple of other brands have been doing it, but they just look fascinating, the way the material that's saved, it looks really good.

Stephen LaMarca:

It's gorgeous, but initially, from somebody that appreciates Swiss watches, I really like seeing integrated parts, or anybody that works in a kitchen or likes cooking knows that kitchen gadgets that only do one thing belong in the trash can. Every tool that you have in the kitchen needs to be multi-role. So be able to do a jack of all trades, but also be excellent at all of them. Anyway, I really like this part because it simplifies by making something more complex.

And the organic shapes from generative AI that can be manufactured using 3D printing are absolutely gorgeous, a work of art, but having done my brakes recently, well, having looked over the shoulder of my technician who is a close friend of mine do all of the work and get their hands dirty for me, I noticed that there's a major flaw with these brake calipers and the suspension knuckle. The suspension knuckle is at the end of the linkage so it's almost at the wheel.

It holds the caliper, the hub and axle assembly, which the wheel is mounted, bolted to, but the rotor goes around the hub and the hub goes through, connects to the axle, which goes through the knuckle of the suspension. Anyway, the knuckle and the caliper are one piece on this car, and again, it's gorgeous. I can't stop saying it, but the big fundamental flaw is you have to take apart the entire suspension and maybe even subframe to change the rotors, which is a general maintenance thing. It's not all the time. It's not like changing your oil, but-

Benjamin Moses:

A car like that, [inaudible 00:04:23] it's going to go through fads.

Stephen LaMarca:

And I'm sure the Czinger official response would be, well, they're carbon ceramic brakes, and when carbon ceramic brakes came out, they were advertised as being like they never fade and they will last the lifetime of the car. Ask any owner of a luxury or high-end performance car with the carbon ceramic brake option, they all tell you, yeah, they're not supposed to, but they warp really easily and when they warp, you need to buy a new $7,000 rotors per corner of your car.

So to add the insult to injury of a $7,000 rotor replacement per corner, what is that, $28,000 to replace your rotors. The entire suspension now needs to be disassembled to get this knuckle caliper off of the car and remove the hub and the axle assembly so the rotor will slide out, and actually, I commented on it and somebody was like, yeah, you've got a good eye, but if you're buying a multimillion dollar hypercar-

Benjamin Moses:

That's the least-

Stephen LaMarca:

You're not doing a brake job yourself.

Benjamin Moses:

But I do see a trend in the little maintenance that I have been doing and plus my car is, excuse me, older, but I do see a trend in packaging sensors into scenarios where they're not quite consumables, but they're high aware areas, and I do see, I tried to change the spark plugs in one of my cars the other day and it was fine, but it's layers and layers of stuff to get to just the spark plug. I was like, it's almost impossible nowadays to do some of the basic maintenance by yourself.

Stephen LaMarca:

This car, this Czinger concept is this beautiful example of how we're just at the tip of the iceberg. We're just at the beginning of the optimization for design for additive manufacturing, but we are in the worst possible position ever, ever, ever in the history of humankind in the design for maintenance.

Benjamin Moses:

And one of the other scenarios that a lot of people are running across is when you're behind a truck and it says, stay back 200 feet, it's not their fault that if your windshield's cracked, which is really annoying, but everyone's going to have a windshield cracked in their life. Now, if you've got a car that has some level of autonomy means not only you got to get the windshield replaced, but now you've got to get sensors calibrated and make sure that everything else along the line works, and I think you've got something about Volvo and-

Stephen LaMarca:

2016, this bothered a lot of gearheads because Volvo came out with their beautifully designed and new design theme, their design language, and they came out with their new headlight and they showed off this gorgeous headlight. They called it the Thor's hammer because it actually looks like a T on its side with the LEDs and everything, but what appalled everybody, aside from its beauty, being a work of art, it actually costs as much as a work of art. It's a $1,400 headlight, which is like, it's still painful today, but everybody's used to that with modern cars.

But it was so painful at the time and it was so offensive at the time, rather, because this was the first headlight of many to come by all manufacturers, it was the first headlight that was a $1,400 headlight, and you think if you get in a little fender bender and you break a headlight, it's a couple hundred dollars for a new headlight assembly and most of the stuff, you'll be able to scavenge like the bulb, all the bulbs and the harness for all of the bulbs, but now, it's a module, but to get up to $1,400 in 2016, the government regulated that there needs to be more electronic driver aids to improve safety of modern vehicles.

Which included lane keep assist and blind spot monitoring for cars over a certain weight limit, which is every car because every car is heavy, super heavy today because engines are getting more powerful, and Ben and I can go on forever. When you increase power, the weight increases exponentially because now everything needs to be durable enough to withstand that power, to be able to contain that power and put it on the ground, but anyway, going back to the blind spot monitoring and lane keep assist integrated into this headlight module, that's all military grade radar technology that they're putting in a consumer headlight. Yeah, it's going to be $1,400 and that's why we're used to it today. It's still painful, but this was the first one.

Benjamin Moses:

And that's an interesting design trace back to the maintenance. So windshield or a windshield headlights, they're not quite consumable, but they're something that could be damaged in the life of the car, and like you said, previous headlights, you replace a certain module, but you're able to extract a lot of things. Those have gone to LED based lights-

Stephen LaMarca:

LEDs are awesome.

Benjamin Moses:

And packaged with other sensors. That's immediately the whole unit has to be replaced, which could be easier, but now the cost of that has significantly skyrocketed and once you have it installed, then you got to recalibrate all the sensors again. So it's a mix, interesting trends.

Stephen LaMarca:

Your headlights need to be aligned.

Benjamin Moses:

Yeah. It's an interesting progression of now we're adding more technology to solve problems like the lane keep assist and driver's aid to a lane detection. So when you're trying to change lanes and it tells you there's a car there, great, but at the cost of if I got to change a headlight, I may have to take a loan.

Elissa Davis:

I will say, if you've got the fancy windshields, don't move to Colorado.

Stephen LaMarca:

Oh my God, the windshields.

Elissa Davis:

Because in Colorado, so instead of salt, they use sand when it snows and so what happens is the little tiny grains of sand get kicked up behind a truck, behind a car, and sometimes you'll be following behind a truck that has the sand in it and it also hits your windshield, and so my parents, they lived in Colorado and they got a crack in their windshield and it had all the fancy sensors on it.

And they couldn't get it changed for a year because it was so expensive, and my mom works in insurance. She's like, we're not filing a claim for this. She's like, we're going to pay out of pocket for this. We're not filing a claim for it. So yeah, highly recommend don't move to Colorado if you've got the fancy stuff on your windshield because it will cost you an arm and a leg.

Stephen LaMarca:

I experienced a similar thing when I was living in Vermont in college. First off, those trucks, those salting and sand trucks fling that stuff out there. It is moving. It's not just like, oh, okay. It's not like one of those lawn care things made by Scott that you picked up at a Home Depot that you just crank to spread fertilizer on your lawn. It is shooting that stuff out, and in Vermont, most of the winter car accidents, most of the car accidents that happened on the interstates in the winter were people merging going way faster than they should because they were trying to get on the highway ahead of those vehicles.

Benjamin Moses:

Yeah, that's rough. On something on a little warmer note, Elissa, you mentioned something about NASA and bees.

Elissa Davis:

Yes. So I picked up a book at Costco, which I was not expecting to find this book at Costco, but it's called NASA's Bees, and the subtitle is The Complete History of Robotics and AI, I think.

Stephen LaMarca:

Wow.

Elissa Davis:

Or automation, AI, something like that, and I looked at the back of it and it had what some of the stuff talks about and I saw nothing about NASA's bees, but the book is called NASA's Bees, so I'm assuming they're just like, hey, we don't need to put it on the back because it's the title.

Stephen LaMarca:

It's messed up. Is this an inside joke that we're on the outside of?

Elissa Davis:

I don't know. I'll let you know when I finish the book.

Benjamin Moses:

NASA's clickbait.

Stephen LaMarca:

Are they sending bees to space?

Ramia Lloyd:

Everyone in NASA is a part of the beehive.

Benjamin Moses:

That's true.

Elissa Davis:

They probably use bees for some sort of experimentation that I'll find out once I read the book, but how it's tied into AI and robotics would be interesting.

Benjamin Moses:

Yeah. Definitely want to hear more about that.

Elissa Davis:

Yeah, once I get into it and start reading it, I'll let you know what it says about NASA's bees.

Benjamin Moses:

Awesome.

Elissa Davis:

Because as of right now, it's just clickbait, so we'll see.

Stephen LaMarca:

Although at one episode later on, we should get into how good some of the odd things that Costco are.

Elissa Davis:

Oh yeah.

Stephen LaMarca:

I bought some pants the other day, I'm like, why am I not shopping at Costco more often?

Elissa Davis:

You got massage chairs. They have a Star Wars pinball machine there right now.

Stephen LaMarca:

Exactly.

Elissa Davis:

It's $700, but my mom's probably going to buy it for my brother for Christmas.

Stephen LaMarca:

They have $1.50 hot dog and drink, fire.

Elissa Davis:

They have not changed the price of that since it opened.

Stephen LaMarca:

And I think the CEO has threatened to do physical harm to anybody that suggests so, which is amazing. I love that. I love that energy. Costco pizza, $10. It's a massive pizza. It's exactly six pounds of cheese. It is measured by automation. The only qualm that I have with a $10 massive pizza from Costco is that the crust is a little too doughy, but we learned last weekend, my fiance and I learned that once you bring the pizza home, you just throw it in the air fryer for five minutes, five, 10 minutes, and it makes that crust nice and cracker-like, perfect.

Benjamin Moses:

Which you can buy the air fryer at Costco.

Elissa Davis:

You can buy an air fryer, you can buy toothbrushes.

Stephen LaMarca:

That's why it's only $10.

Benjamin Moses:

Exactly.

Ramia Lloyd:

They have a taco platter.

Elissa Davis:

Oh my God.

Ramia Lloyd:

It's so good.

Elissa Davis:

Their pre-made meals are basically my favorite thing.

Ramia Lloyd:

[inaudible 00:14:25].

Benjamin Moses:

Ramia, can you tell us about today's sponsor, please?

Ramia Lloyd:

Our sponsors today is IMTS+, manufacturing digital content to get you ready for IMTS and after. We host videos and articles and topics relevant to manufacturing technologies and the business of manufacturing, and it's all free, I guarantee you'll find something you like. Check out season three of Road Tripping with Steve where our friend Steve is doing big things in the Magic Motor City.

Benjamin Moses:

Thanks, Ramia.

Stephen LaMarca:

That was a blast. That was a really fun trip, by the way.

Ramia Lloyd:

Thank you.

Benjamin Moses:

I feel like we always have a good time in Detroit.

Stephen LaMarca:

This is why at MT Forecast, which is in Detroit this year, the three tours that we had as options for our attendees to go on, it was Lyft, Fanuc, and [inaudible 00:15:14], and the Lyft and Fanuc, you can see my tour on video.

Elissa Davis:

Lyft talked about it while we were there.

Stephen LaMarca:

Yay. I love them so much.

Elissa Davis:

They were like, we did Road Tripping with Steve recently and I was like, yeah, I know.

Stephen LaMarca:

Dude, I love it so much when PhDs accept me. It makes me feel so good.

Benjamin Moses:

Also, tell me about our test bed. We got some updates coming up.

Stephen LaMarca:

Bought some new parts. I still haven't installed the robot. It's sitting there in its box. The box is open so everybody can look at it and poke at it, but still haven't installed it yet. We've got a big renovation coming up in the office, so it's going to collect dust anyway, but I wanted to make sure that I ordered the accessories, the end of arm tooling. So I ordered three things, the gripper, the mounting plate specifically for said gripper to be attached to this version of the robot, and the cable. Mounting plate was like a hundred bucks. The cable, which is it's a six-inch cable, $55. This is audio file grade equipment there, and then the gripper, I don't know if I should mention the manufacturer. It's an industrial grade company.

Benjamin Moses:

They can see the pictures once we have it posted.

Stephen LaMarca:

But man, it was expensive.

Benjamin Moses:

Yeah, it's a good gripper though.

Stephen LaMarca:

The gripper [inaudible 00:16:34]. Everybody in the industry knows this, but I feel like such a noob for being shocked by this, the gripper's almost as expensive as the robot and everybody in the industry would probably tell me, yeah, that tracks,

Benjamin Moses:

It's kind of like buying a firearm. Your optic has cost the-

Stephen LaMarca:

Your scope needs to be twice the price of the rifle.

Benjamin Moses:

Exactly.

Stephen LaMarca:

People don't realize that.

Elissa Davis:

Yes.

Benjamin Moses:

I heard you found something on AI and deciphering code.

Elissa Davis:

I did. So there's a project going on called Project Vesuvius and they have these scrolls that were carbonized basically after the eruption of Mount Vesuvius thousands of years ago.

Stephen LaMarca:

Like on Zolo?

Elissa Davis:

What?

Benjamin Moses:

He was stuck in the carbonite.

Stephen LaMarca:

That was carbonite, not carbon.

Elissa Davis:

It was carbonite.

Stephen LaMarca:

My bad.

Elissa Davis:

Carbonized. I was so confused. I was like was Mount Vesuvius in Star Wars and I missed it?

Stephen LaMarca:

I should really let people talk.

Benjamin Moses:

Although this is true.

Elissa Davis:

So they have these scrolls and they haven't been read in over 2000 years, and this 21 year old student actually was able to use AI to decipher the word. I'm going to double check that I say this right. It's the word purple in Latin, in old Latin, porfirus, which is the ancient Greek word for purple, and so this was, he won $40,000 as a prize from Project Vesuvius. He's like second place.

The first place prize has not been won yet, but they're also using a bunch of different types of software and everything to decipher different parts of the scrolls, but yeah, so he figured out that word and then it was independently also tested separately to make sure that he didn't fake the results and it was proven. So he's only 21 years old. He's now $40,000 richer because he was able to find the word purple on a scroll.

Benjamin Moses:

And I think a layer to that complexity is that I think you mentioned earlier, it's a rolled up scroll, but because it was so old and it was you're unable to unscroll it-

Elissa Davis:

It would literally disintegrate if they tried try to unroll it.

Benjamin Moses:

So they had to see through the different layers to detect and that's why it detected one word so far.

Stephen LaMarca:

They should send it to Lumafield.

Elissa Davis:

They have-

Stephen LaMarca:

How did they scan it?

Elissa Davis:

So some places are using CT scans because some of the scrolls have metal in the ink, so they're able to pick up the letters from the metal in the ink, but this was not one of them. This one was different, so that's why they couldn't use the same technology, but if you go to the Project Vesuvius website, they have a bunch of people have won a bunch of different prizes for it and you can see all the different, because I think they're using CAD/CAM software and everything too to help figure out what it is, and it's really, really interesting, but I was just like, dang, I can imagine what I would do with $40,000 at 21 years old. Pay off my student debt probably.

Benjamin Moses:

That's pretty good though. That's a pretty good project. That's fine.

Elissa Davis:

Yeah, but I'm like-

Stephen LaMarca:

I wouldn't do anything smart.

Elissa Davis:

I'm a little bit of a technology nerd, but before everything, I'm a major history nerd and so I thought that was so cool because basically, everything from Vesuvius was destroyed, but obviously, they uncovered this city. It's like Herculaneum, I think is what it's called, in the 1700s and they've been taking pieces from it since then, and apparently, it was also the home of Julius Caesar's father-in-law.

Benjamin Moses:

Cool.

Elissa Davis:

Yeah, so this is one of those scrolls that they've been able to decipher. The million dollar prize will go to someone who's able to decipher two pages worth of continuous lettering.

Stephen LaMarca:

This young man got $40,000 for just getting purple?

Elissa Davis:

Yes. The word purple in old Latin.

Stephen LaMarca:

Of the time period, right? Is that true?

Benjamin Moses:

I don't know.

Stephen LaMarca:

I know that's what history teachers said.

Elissa Davis:

But it was on the Smithsonian Magazine website. That's where I found it.

Stephen LaMarca:

That's awesome. That's incredible.

Benjamin Moses:

I did like the extension of all these different use cases for artificial intelligence and machine learning, and I think that's a really good intersection of one, the applicability of someone fairly early in their career and their application of it, and that's something we've been testing is how mature our technology is of basically how young can someone deploy it.

So when you talk about empty connect, we're working with undergrads at Virginia Tech to see can you do this basically by yourself, and we've been exploring that idea and it's fairly straightforward and being able to apply AI at a very early stage in their career and to a very complex project. So not only are you looking at a sheet of paper to try and decipher something, but also trying to look through different layers, and I think that's where the subtlety comes from.

Stephen LaMarca:

This is also a little bit scary because isn't Mount Vesuvius getting a little spicy again too?

Elissa Davis:

Probably.

Stephen LaMarca:

Aren't they detecting some seismic activity?

Elissa Davis:

It's been 2000 years since it erupted, so I wouldn't be surprised, but the scroll itself looks like a burnt log. That's literally what it looks like.

Stephen LaMarca:

That's nuts. Who would've known?

Elissa Davis:

Apparently AI.

Benjamin Moses:

Steve.

Stephen LaMarca:

What up?

Benjamin Moses:

You got something on additive?

Stephen LaMarca:

Yeah. Okay. So I saw a little thing on LinkedIn recently of an additive company, additive technology company, [inaudible 00:21:51], really cute name. I actually really like that name, but what was getting so much hype on LinkedIn was that the drives to move the, I guess extrusion head along the axes of the machine was not belt driven and it wasn't a ball screw. It was magnets. This thing was running on magnet rails like a modern rollercoaster, but it just looks like a regular 3D printer. They're not claiming to have any special additive technology strictly like the 3D printing. I think it's material extrusion. I think it's filament on it or something. It's not photo polymerization. It's not a laser powder bed.

Benjamin Moses:

They're interested in the motion control of additives.

Stephen LaMarca:

They're interested in the motion control, and I haven't seen anything like it, but it's not like I've seen everything.

Benjamin Moses:

No, and I think that's an interesting case because when you look at the additive head, like pure additive or 3D printing, it's a very light head. If you compare that to subtractive processes, the weight that the bed and the waves have to sustain on those machines are significantly different in additive. That's why seeing applications like delta arms with extrusion heads and using magnets for motion control is fairly interesting, and I'm wondering what the benefit of that is versus traditional ball screws or belt-driven scenarios.

Stephen LaMarca:

I am too dumb to know, but I can tell you that the pre-orders for this new magnet driven machine, thing's sold out.

Benjamin Moses:

Wow. That's cool.

Stephen LaMarca:

They've stopped taking pre-orders. We don't know if we can deliver these on time, so stop buying it. Let's fill the orders that we have, but thank you for your business. So that's exciting.

Benjamin Moses:

And I think I'll do a little research to see if other machine technology companies have used Maglove for that.

Stephen LaMarca:

Who's the company that makes the weighs for all CNC machine? Like THX or something? No, that's the audio company.

Benjamin Moses:

I'm not sure.

Stephen LaMarca:

THK?

Benjamin Moses:

They do the... Yes.

Stephen LaMarca:

They make the weighs. THK might be buying somebody soon. They might be buying an additive company soon. I'm just saying.

Elissa Davis:

You mentioned roller coaster and 3D printing in the same sentence. Now I can't stop thinking about when we're going to get our first 3D printed roller coaster.

Stephen LaMarca:

It just makes sense because all the organic shapes-

Elissa Davis:

Wouldn't it?

Stephen LaMarca:

Like the loop-the-loop.

Elissa Davis:

And I feel like we can create really strong materials so it won't break or-

Stephen LaMarca:

You know the thing is going to be made by an army of yellow robots.

Benjamin Moses:

Speaking of robots, I've got an article from TechCrunch on how roboticists are thinking about generative AI. So generative AI has come a long way, particularly with large language models and ChatGTP and things like that, but how, GPT.

Elissa Davis:

[inaudible 00:24:56]. Your face immediately.

Stephen LaMarca:

You've been using this for the past a year and a half.

Benjamin Moses:

I always get the letters mixed up. Whatever. And it's interesting when we look at how training models exist and how the AI algorithms are learning to be more efficient and constantly ingesting information. There's a couple of interesting scenarios where here when they talk about why is this important to manufacturing or robotics, they interviewed a couple of people and they talked to Nvidia and GM about the scenario and they talk about the productivity improvements of getting from basically a starting point to a 70% working model or efficiency in the cell to significantly faster than previous tools.

So being able to accelerate the task or scenarios that you need the robot to do, they talked about accelerating that process. So from time to purchasing our goods to getting the robot up and running, that time's shrinking significantly, and we've talked about that over the return on investment on some of these tools. So I think generative AI has a lot of opportunity to talk about that or to help accelerate that. The other one that they interview is someone from MIT CSAIL and they're doing a lot in robotics and they're very interesting to keep an eye.

I like their research videos that they produce on YouTube, super dry, but really fun to watch. So I definitely recommend checking out CSAIL's YouTube channel, but it talks about generous AI, powerful problem solving for motion planning scenarios. So when we look at warehouse robots, but even if we start applying this to additive scenarios or robots within a cell where you have some level of engagement or fluidity within a cell, being able to path find in those scenarios, I think, helps maintain productivity.

So the easiest parallel that I've seen is if you're playing video games, playing against bots, every once in a while, you see a bot stuck in a corner. Why is that guy there? It's because a crate fell down or another person stuck in his way. So being able to have robots continually update their pathfinding within the context of safety, I think that's something that the CSAIL team mentioned.

And also, it talks about pattern generation, so providing context for physics and the physics world and being able to simulate that scenario. So almost to parallel of the digital twin. So being able to simulate what the machine could do before it gets to the physical world. So that's another scenario where they think generative AI could help in the simulation world or the digital twin world where they want to see what are the kinematics of this scenario and how do they program and develop the scenarios within simulation world before you get to the real world. So definitely a really interesting read from TechCrunch on-

Stephen LaMarca:

This is the first time I've been concerned about AI.

Benjamin Moses:

The first time?

Stephen LaMarca:

First time. I'm very pro AI, but now I'm nervous because, so going back to when generative design was first becoming a thing, I was over in San Francisco visiting Autodesk and one of their executives, I think an executive, described their work that they themselves were doing in generative as the power of generative design is like having the access to 100 interns at your fingertips that can do a year's worth of work in 15 minutes all at once.

And now you take that intelligence, that capability and you put it in a robot arm and give that robot arm three more robot arms and turn it into a humanoid robot, and now we've got robot AI interns and now we're not going to have any humans to be real interns and now there's going to be this huge skills gap of people with education and no experience so they'll never get hired.

Benjamin Moses:

And that's an interesting conversation related to... That's a funny dream, but-

Elissa Davis:

I feel like that escalated so quickly.

Benjamin Moses:

Everyone is concerned about AI taking over the world on many different layers. So being able to use an agent for decision making on digital physical world too when you connect to the robots, but I see the parallel on a lot of the use cases that we've seen that's actually productive. It's supplementing human decision making or human processes. When we use it in our writing that we do weekly, it's supporting our writing process. We're never taking a wholesale. A couple of weeks ago, I talked about using chat to help define a qualification or inspection processes. It's supporting you. It gives you a baseline so it helps accelerate the process. So it never really gives you a solution-

Stephen LaMarca:

It doesn't do it for you.

Benjamin Moses:

Yeah, there's a lot of nuances that are missing from the algorithm that's not trained in there, and that's where-

Stephen LaMarca:

I'd say it gets you to a solid 50%. It gets you halfway there.

Benjamin Moses:

Exactly.

Ramia Lloyd:

I'm okay with robots taking all the unpaid internships.

Benjamin Moses:

That's fair. That's a spicy [inaudible 00:30:13].

Stephen LaMarca:

Sometimes you really need that experience though.

Ramia Lloyd:

You do.

Stephen LaMarca:

And nobody's willing to pay for it.

Ramia Lloyd:

But they should.

Stephen LaMarca:

You're right. Okay. If expressing my concern has accomplished anything, it's that people who are afraid of AI, robotics, and automation are dumb.

Benjamin Moses:

Fair. On that, Ramia, where can they find more info about us?

Ramia Lloyd:

Amtonline.org/resources. Like, share, subscribe.

Benjamin Moses:

Bye, everyone.

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Benjamin Moses
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Technology
By Stephen LaMarca | Feb 09, 2024

ChemGPT. Terminator T-1000 IRL. 3D printed logic modules. A new occupational category. Manual versus automatic CNC.

6 min
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Technology
By Bonnie Gurney | Feb 08, 2024

At IMTS 2024, discover unexpected solutions, including haptic feedback to improve remote robot operation and digital training, quality control software, additive manufacturing powders and gases, services to address labor issues via an app, and more.

5 min